At the Center of Payhem

At the Center of Payhem

Cultural differences, things lost in translation, eye-opening practices…

With members representing over 40 countries, there really is no such thing as “common sense” or “the correct answer” here at PayPay. There are as many perspectives, perceptions, and business practices as there are languages and cultures. Nonetheless, we still manage to create new value, hacking our way through all the chaos by unwavering communication. In fact, we cherish this frenzied enterprise as an important aspect of PayPay’s culture.

Read on to see what we make of MEETINGS and FEEDBACK at PayPay, and don’t miss out on new topics and voices that will be added on a regular basis. Lo and behold the world of Payhem.

Payhem about “FEEDBACK”

UPDATE

Harsh [Engineer]

FREQUENCY

[Payhem I’ve encountered]
Timely feedback is rare. For example, you can’t correlate feedback to something that happened 6 months ago.

[My approach to Payhem]
Immediate feedback is crucial to correlating and understanding.

Jonathan [IT Control]

READING THE AIR

[Payhem I’ve encountered]
Things become increasingly ambiguous when people “read the air.”

[My approach to Payhem]
Clearly say whether something is right or wrong. Or let them know what improvements can be made next time. Feedback may be given for any situation and should be considered a constructive way to promote growth, improvement, and as a way to effectively collaborate among teams and individuals.

Harsh [Engineer]

NOT USED TO IT

[Payhem I’ve encountered]
Many are not used to feedback from their bosses, but there are even less people used to receiving feedback from colleagues and subordinates.

[My approach to Payhem]
Build relationships between you and your bosses or your colleagues that allows for honest feedback, both good and bad.

Taiki [Business]

NOT USED TO IT

[Payhem I’ve encountered]
Some people might think that they are being attacked when they receive feedback.

[My approach to Payhem]
When you give feedback, it’s important that it’s not aimed at the person but at their actions or the situation.

Harsh [Engineer]

NOT USED TO IT

[Payhem I’ve encountered]
You need to be very careful how to word your feedback, avoiding direct feedback and asking questions instead.

[My approach to Payhem]
The more often constructive feedback happens, the more easily people will get used to feedback.

Payhem in “MEETINGS”

Chizuko [Business]

FACILITATION

[Payhem I’ve Encountered]
Facilitators of long-winded meetings tend to ask “this is the problem we have – what do you think?”

[My Approach to Payhem]
Facilitators should focus on what needs to be done to solve the problem

Jonathan [IT Control]

FACILITATION

[Payhem I’ve Encountered]
There’s really no need to read out aloud materials in a meeting

[My Approach to Payhem]
Materials should be shared in advance so that the meeting is focused on discussing key points or how to drive actions

Taiki [Business]

DECISION MAKING & PARTICIPATION

[Payhem I’ve Encountered]
A top-down business tends to take away the power to decide from individuals or make it difficult to share challenges

[My Approach to Payhem]
Make sure participants have the power to make a decision

Harsh [Engineer]

DECISION MAKING & PARTICIPATION

[Payhem I’ve Encountered]
In Japan, the meeting goes on until everyone agrees

[My Approach to Payhem]
Only those who are truly involved or who have the power to make a decision should participate in a meeting

Harsh [Engineer]

FAILING

[Payhem I’ve Encountered]
It’s hard to make a decision straight away because in Japan everyone wants to go with the “safe” approach

[My Approach to Payhem]
Mistakes and failures need to be allowed to promote timely decisions and swift action

Linsai [PM]

OTHER CULTURES

[Payhem I’ve Encountered]
I’ve been in meetings where people avoid trying to come across as harsh when someone says something stupid

[My Approach to Payhem]
If someone says something stupid people point it out straight away where I’m from, but here, I subtly raise a question so that the person realizes the problem

Chizuko [Business]

OTHER CULTURES

[Payhem I’ve Encountered]
Working at one company for your whole life is still relatively common in Japan, so there are people with experience in just one work environment

[My Approach to Payhem]
We have it lucky at PayPay – there are so many people with different backgrounds, there’s that many opportunities to share & learn different and effective meeting styles

Taiki [Business]

OTHER CULTURES

[Payhem I’ve Encountered]
OJT is still quite common in Japan, which means you’re not all that exposed to different ways of holding meetings

[My Approach to Payhem]
Studying different styles of holding/facilitating meetings makes a difference